Dried Flowers

HOW TO AIR DRY YOUR FLOWERS

DRIED PEONY

DRIED PEONY

When it comes to my flowers, I like to produce as little waste as possible. There are several ways I accomplish this:

  • I buy what's in season and choose the blooms that will be in my arrangements every week. This way I know that every single stem will be used.
  • I offer one size when it comes to my local arrangements this way I can calculate, calculate AND calculate the exact amount of blooms and greens I need.  #mathwizard
  • Of course, no matter what I do there are still blooms that don't make the cut (pun :-). So, I air dry all of my "extras".

I know there are many different ways to dry flowers. Mostly, depending on what type you are trying to dry. But I've stuck to this technique. I've dried everything from peonies to roses, eucalyptus to hydrangeas and daisies to lavender. I've had great success with letting the flowers and air do its thing.

Drying flowers not only keeps the memory alive, but it's beautiful decoration for your house (if that's your style). I have dried flowers everywhere - by my bed, on my desk, in my closet and its always included in my packaging (I love adding a few dried flowers or petals when I ship things off).

DRIED ROSES

DRIED ROSES

It only takes 2 steps to dry your flowers:

  1. Remove excess foliage from flowers and cut stems to desired length (no shorter than six inches). To help flowers retain their color during the drying process, make sure to remove them from sunlight as soon as they’re cut. Hang flowers individually or rubber-band stems together to hang a bouquet.
  2. Find a dark, dry area with good circulation. Tie and secure the bottom of the flowers’ stems to a hanger so that they hang upside down to dry. Leave flowers for two to three weeks until completely dry.
DRIED LAVENDER AND FRIENDS

DRIED LAVENDER AND FRIENDS

sm_driedbunch1

Tips:

DRIED ASSORTMENT

DRIED ASSORTMENT

  • Air drying flowers does take several weeks (but worth it) and need a cool dark place in your house for it to dry properly and retain its color. The closet works best, a dark room, or a shady spot away from direct sunlight.
  • Hanging robust flowers such as roses and lavender work well. For bigger blooms such as hydrangeas letting them dry in their vase once the water is dry is best. Once the water has evaporated the flowers will dry gradually. This method will help retain more of their fresh-flower color vibrancy than if left upside down.
DRIED HYDRANGEA

DRIED HYDRANGEA

Once your flowers are dried the possibilities are endless. I'll touch on the many uses of dried flowers in future blog posts. :-)

 

xo,
S